Life’s Handicaps

Of all the books I own (which is quite a few), few have provided as much food for thought than Lost Art Press’ four volume set “The Woodworker: The Charles H. Hayward Years”. Amidst the articles on woodworking trends and techniques are hidden Charles’ outlook on life and work. Despite being written between 1939 and 1967, the concepts are still as relevant today as they were 50+ years ago.

This Lost Art Press blog post, and the following quote in particular, seem particularly relevant to the search for community. Enjoy!

“To see life opening out before us as something rich in possibilities, of developing interests, is to feel a quickening of the spirit, a sense of purpose that will carry us a long way. What we have to forget are the shallow judgments, our own and other people’s, which may have coloured and restricted our youth. If we cling on to them still, then our whole lives may remain enclosed in a narrow groove. We have to be adventurers and explorers, having the initiative and courage to find out our own capabilities, not only in the things that have come easily to use, but in the more difficult things as well.”

Lost Art Press

Scan Cover of “Woodworker Annual,” The Woodworker Volume 63, Being the Twelve Monthly Copies, January-December, 1959

“We are all apt to cling to youth as if it were the whole of life, the remainder an uncomfortable margin that does not really count. The obvious attractiveness of youth, its bounding health and vigour, its enthusiasms and ambitions, conspire to hide from our eyes the pleasures and discoveries that can come with maturity.

‘Grow old along with me
The best is yet to be
The last of life, for which the first was made’

“wrote Browning in ‘Rabbi Ben Ezra,’ that beautiful poem in which he unfolds the whole panorama of life and experience. It is an inspiring panorama if we accept it in its wholeness, not youth only, that time of raw beginnings, but those later years in which we garner the fruits. Little by little the really experiencing man learns to…

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